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Monthly Archives - June 2019

Trail-Running Weekend recap June 7, 8, 9

The Trail World Championships and the San Diego 100 both had races this weekend, and we’ve got the results for both, as well as a sneak preview of next week’s Lavaredo and Western States 100. Read on for all the latest info!

The Trail World Championships

The 9th Trail World Championships took place in Portugal in Miranda do Corvo on Saturday, with 411 athletes participating (compared to 33 at the first Championships in 2007). Tackling 44 km of varying terrain, the athletes had to grapple with 2120 meters of ascent and 1970 meters of descent while making their way through the area surrounding the fourth largest urban center in Portugal, among many archaeological structures dating back to the Roman era.

Men

The big winner of this year’s Trail World Championships was Jonathan Albon from the United Kingdom, who crossed the finish line adorned with sweat, a smile and his nation’s flag at 3:35:34. Close behind him was France’s Julien Rancon, whose final time was 3:37:47.

In third place for the men was Switzerland’s Christian Mathys (3:40:33), followed by Francesco Puppi of Italy (3:40:44) and Nicolas Martin of France (3:42:27).

Also worth noting is an unfortunate finish for Spain’s Luis Alberto Hernando, the trail runner/sky-runner and 2006 Olympian with multiple gold medals on his impressive resume, but who ultimately ended with a time outside the top 10 field which included:

6 – Emmanuel Meyssat (France) – 3:43:20

7 – Ludovic Pommeret (France) –  3:44:01

8 – Antonio Martinez (Spain) – 3:44:40

9 – Andreu Simon (Spain) – 3:46:12

10 – Helio Fumo (Portugal) – 3:47:34

Women

A logjam of women were observed racing through the streets, angling for second place near the completion of the race. But it was clearly France’s Blandine L’hirondel who was in it to win it, as she led the women’s pack with a time of 4:06:15. Crossing the finish line with a huge smile on her face and countless observers cheering her on, you’d never know that L’hirondel had just put her body through such exertion if it wasn’t for the bib.

In second place was New Zealand’s Ruth Croft, finishing about 8 minutes behind at 4:14:27. Third place went to Sheila Aviles of Spain, who collapsed after crossing the finish line in an emotional moment after her 4:15:03 finish.

In fourth place was Spain’s Azara Garcia (4:15:30), as the women’s finishers continued to pile in close together. Fifth then went to Romania’s Denisa Dragomir, with a time of 4:17:06.

The rest of the top 10 included:

6 – Silvia Rampazzo (Italy) – 4:17:50

7 – Gemma Arenas (Spain) – 4:21:22

8 – Sarah Vieuille (France) – 4:22:10

9 – Aydee Loayza (Peru) – 4:22:31

10 – Adeline Roche (France) – 4:22:45

San Diego 100 Mile Endurance Run

The 19th installment of the San Diego 100 took place yesterday, traversing Mt. Laguna’s Pacific Crest, Noble Canyon and Lake Cuyamaca Trails. It took 100 grueling miles to separate the top two competitors, both accomplished ultra-runners who were determined to hang tough and ultimately finished barely two minutes apart.

Men

Zach Bitter and Christopher Hammes were neck-and-neck for much of the race, with the rest of the pack finishing about two hours or more behind them. As the San Diego 100 Twitter account breathlessly reported, the duo pulled into the Pioneer Mail Historic Site (28.2 miles along the course) just before nightfall at about 3 minutes apart. From there until the end, Bitter and Hammes ran in close proximity, thrilling observers of the race.

Bitter ultimately finished in first with a time of 16:49:13, while Hammes fell just short at 16:51:53. In third place was Eric Earnshaw with a time of 18:45:14.

Fourth- and fifth-place went to Matt Preslar and Sean Ranney at 19:58:47 and 20:22:03, respectively.

The rest of the top 10 included:

6 – Marc Robinson – 21:59:01

7 – David Aguayo – 22:04:54

8 – Danny Goold – 22:47:48

9 – Tim Cadogan – 23:01:19

10 – Derek Mondin – 23:11:22

Women

On the women’s side, Teresa Kaiser held a commanding lead for much of the race, ultimately finishing with a time more than 3-and-a-half hours better than her nearest competitor. Her final time of 20:18:57 placed her an impressive fifth overall.

Word came in around 17 hours into the race that Kaiser had opened up a commanding lead on Jade de la Rosa, who ultimately finished in third place with a time of 24:15:15. In between them was second place finisher Rebecca Murillo, who came on strong to finish at 23:15:36.

Fourth and fifth place went to Pargol Lakhan (24:57:44) and Laura Dunn (25:08:16) respectively.

The rest of the top 10 included:

6 – Deborah Cosmetis – 25:41:15

7 – Sarah Emoto – 25:42:03

8 – Katherina Laan – 26:03:59

9 – Katie Trent – 26:56:30

10 – Cynthia Rivera – 27:12:03

Coming up soon on the calendar are the Lavaredo Ultra Trail (June 28 in Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy) and the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run (June 29 in Squaw Valley, California). The Western States bills itself as the world’s oldest 100-mile trail race and as one of the ultimate endurance tests in the world. The Lavaredo, meanwhile, has been touted as one of the most beautiful running races in the world. Stay tuned to Irun4Ultra for the latest results and racing news from around the globe.

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2019 Hardrock

2019 Hardrock threatened by snow, avalanche conditions

By Larry Carroll

One might think that scheduling an ultra-marathon in Colorado in early July would seem to be a pretty safe bet, weather-wise. Of course, a focal point of the Hardrock Hundred Mile Endurance Run (founded in 1992) has always been pushing athletes with extreme altitudes and multiple climate zones that can bring subzero temperatures, thunderstorms and other weather anomalies. But this year, snowy conditions may be putting a chill on the festivities.

2019 Hardrock

“There have been record levels of snow late into the season down in Southern Colorado this year,” the Hardrock’s official Instagram feed posted recently. “We wanted to give you an update on what this means for Hardrock 2019.”

Indeed, this year’s “snowpack” (a term referring to layers of accumulated snow) is an astounding 202 percent of its season-to-date average at this time of year. According to the Denver Post, the snowpack is approximately five times larger than it was at this time last year. Although many entrants of the Hardrock have often used crampons, trekking poles and other such equipment typically associated with mountain climbing, such conditions are threatening to make the race impossible for even such adventurous souls.

2019 Hardrock

“The Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run is currently monitoring the snowpack conditions within the San Juan Mountains,” explain the organizers of the annual race, dedicated to the memory of miners who settles the area. “We encourage everyone … to regularly monitor the Hardrock social media channels and our website to stay as up to date as possible on the situation.”

Entering the third week of May, snowpack was 302 percent of its average in the San Juan Mountains. For a race held on a loop course that traverses four-wheel-drive, cross country and dirt trails on the San Juan Range, from Silverton to Telluride to the 14,048-foot summit of Handles Peak, such snowfall could be a disaster in more ways than one. At the moment, Hardrock organizers aren’t officially telling athletes to stay home — but posted under an ominous picture of a truck squeezing between walls of snow is a message that seems anything but assuring.

The decision to proceed or postpone the July 19 scheduled event “is based on the Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) measured at the Red Mountain Pass SNOTEL site.” Adding that another consideration this year is a number of avalanches that have occurred in the area, the Hardrock statement sets June 1st as a pivotal date of judgment. “Should the SWE be equal to or less than 23″ … the Run will take place … If the SWE is greater than 23″ on June 1st of this year and/or avalanche impact is still questionable, then a decision will be made by the Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run management.”

Although rare, a cancellation wouldn’t be without precedent. The 2002 Hardrock didn’t take place because of nearby forest fires — and the 1995 installment was cancelled because of too much snow.   

2019 Hardrock

Over on Hardrock’s Facebook page, athletes and observers point out that the SWE has actually gone in the wrong direction since race organizers posted their statement, and question whether the lengthy wait to get a slot will carry over to next year in case of cancellation.

“We understand that considerable planning and resources goes into being a part of the Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run,” the statement says. “With that in mind, as information on the snowpack and avalanche debris conditions and their possible impact on the running of the 2019 Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run becomes available to us we will work as fast as possible to pass any pertinent information along to all members of the Hardrock community.”

Will the Hardrock be able to navigate this sizeable obstacle, much like its participants have to do every July? As intimidating as those walls of snow may look, three decades of Hardrock runs have taught the running community that these are not athletes you’d be wise to bet against.



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